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Elite Rampa Turbo Trainer Review – Zwift Gear Test

Power meter vs. Power estimator. Does it matter? Rather than a strain gauge, the Elite Rampa uses a power estimator, Elite have previously championed the optical power meter with the Drivo, so what effect does that bring to the Elite Rampa? We look at power accuracy as we try to answer the common question “How does it Zwift?” in this latest Zwift Gear Test!

Elite Rampa Turbo Trainer Review – Zwift Gear Test

So I’ve already reviewed the Elite Drivo, their top of the line, all singing, all dancing, direct-mount trainer. As you move down the Elite range towards the mid-tier offerings, you come to the Elite Rampa, a wheel-on smart trainer, bringing the ANT+ FE-C protocol, for all of your Zwifting needs, as a very keen price point

Elite Rampa

Just from an external perspective, I think the Rampa looks cool. The flared wings of the A-frame stand give it a visually appealing look. There is a lot that can be said about the Wahoo KICKR Snap, but I think to describe the Snap as aesthetically pleasing might be an exaggeration. Utilitarian yes, a looker…not so much

Elite Rampa

There are MANY more wheel-on turbos in indoor trainer market than there are direct-mount units, so apart from a snazzy colour scheme of white with black and red highlights, what else is Elite bringing to the table in these great trainer wars? Let’s take a look!

Device Design

The Elite box, is a brightly coloured affair, continuing the company colour palette, but we are not really interested in the box, we want to see the goodies inside!

Elite Rampa

Not unlike the Elite Drivo, inside the box for Rampa, are more boxes. Of all of the turbos which I have come across, the Rampa is probably the unit which has needed the most assembly, followed very closely by the Cycleops Magnus,

Elite Rampa

Inside the smaller of the two boxes are all of the usual gubbins which goes with a trainer. Elite Rampa manual, turbo skewer, earthing wire, Zwift voucher (naturally), and a small sachet of warm up gel – (interesting, but definitely an odd feeling when you use it!)

Elite Rampa

In the larger box, we’ve got the power adapter and the actual resistance unit that takes the Elite Rampa from being a fancy A-frame to a fully fledged smart trainer

Elite Rampa

When you get the resistance unit out of the box, you see one of the innovations which Elite has made the Rampa. The actual roller unit has bene increased in diameter to by 10mm compared to their other wheel on offerings. As well as swelling to 40mm and that roller is now covered in a (colour palette correct) red Elastogel, which was developed in conjunction with Bayer. The Elastogel is advertised to reduced the noise of the roller by 50%, and reduced wear on the tyre by 20%, whilst reducing vibrations, and improving both tyre grip, and the performance of the trainer when using a mountain bike tyre.

Elite Rampa

That is quite a list of claims from a simple coating. What I can say though, is that it definitely feels a little…strange when you actually touch the elastomer. It’s hard to believe that the application of rubber to a metal tube is going to be durable in any way shape or form, but surprisingly it is! After a couple of months use the Rampa roller now looks like this – a small mark from the tyre, but nil else.

Elite Rampa

The Elite Rampa A-frame has two bolts on the bottom; these are removed to install a plastic arm, which in turn has the resistance unit mounted

Elite Rampa

Whilst, not the hardest fitness product I have had to put together, I did have to resort to reading the instructions when building the Elite Rampa. Although for some of the hieroglyphs, I still had to consider contacting the British Museum for translations – a few of the pictures appear just to show screws going into non-specific locations on black box on the first glance!

Elite Rampa

Speaking of screws holding the resistance unit. There are two large bolts on the base of the unit; it is important that you chose the right holes for your wheel, so closest the trainer for 650 wheels or mountain bikes, and further back for the larger wheels. This is important to ensure that you are applying correct pressure to the tyre when you mount your bike

Elite Rampa

The final bit of assembly requires you to attack an earthing wire to the unit. I’m not seen another turbo needing to be earthed, so I wonder if this is due to the Elastogel causing a static charge build up over time?
Elite Ramap
Once everything is bolted together, you can flip the turbo over and marvel at what your engineering prowess has produced!
Elite RampaWith the trainer has been assembled, it is an excellent opportunity to comment on the other features. On one side we’ve a nice meaty red lever to ensure that your bike is held securely, there is a small amount of plastic flex, but it still closes with a reassuring locking sound
Elite Rampa
You can address the pressure that the clamp exerts on your skewer by twisting the rods coming out of one side of the clamp. This is a very simple way of adjusting pressure, no bars, or lock rings to adjust, something that other trainers could do with recognising.
Elite Rampa
ON the base of the unit, I was surprised to find the feet on the Rampa are simply hard plastic ribs, which by the look of them would not provide much grip. However, the feet on the Ramp, do their job very well and stop the unit moving about when you get out of the saddle. It’s quite clear that Elite has worked with some skilled materials guys during their planning phase!
Elite Rampa
The underside of the Elite Rampa has strengthening fins placed on the bottom of the plastic “wings”. Which gives both surprisingly flex resistant frame, but also a TREMENDOUSLY light package. Coming in at 1kg lighter than the KICKR Snap, the unit is probably one of the easier to move around, as you just don’t notice the weight.
Elite Rampa
Speaking of moving things around, when you have finished your Zwift session, the Elite Rampa also packs up into a nice slim package, which is also quite happy to free stand, so trainers to have a habit of toppling over when stood up.
Elite RampaAt the very back of the machine is the resistance unit. We have a very prominent, highly polished flywheel – you don’t want to touch this when going for the attack on Watopia KOM! Unlike something such as the Cycleops Magnus which has weight saving fins cut off its flywheel, designed to compensate for reduced mass with increased air resistance, Elite is firm in their belief that the best responsiveness and feel on a turbo only comes from a carefully calibrated, weight specific flywheel
Elite Rampa
Directly below the elastogel roller is the clamp handle and knob for adjusting the pressure against the tyre. There may be several innovative features on the Rampa, but this isn’t one of them. The knob doesn’t have the best grip and can be a little fiddly to tighten at times. Given the thought which has apparently gone into other parts of the trainer, I was a little surprised, as this almost feels like an afterthought, yet the contact between tyre and trainer can have a significant effect on power readings
Elite Rampa
The “smart” part of the trainer, the brains if you will is held on the opposite side to the flywheel. Through the top vents, you can see a piece of the metal wheel inside the unit. When the Elite Rampa is powered up, very much like it’s Drivo big brother, there is an electronic noise as this plate moves into place preparing for use. I always think of it as a “powering up noise” and quite like it
Elite Rampa
One bit that I don’t like though on the Elite Rampa resistance unit though is the exposed power connectors and a circuit board. Also as seen on the Drivo. I’ve not heard of anyone bricking their trainer with sweat getting inside, but I’m always a little cautious about electrics and water and wonder if a cover, or flap or some sort may have been an idea.
Elite Rampa

Specification

  • Communications: ANT+, ANT+ FE-C, and Bluetooth 4.0
  • Resistance type: Electromagnetic
  • Accuracy: +/- 5%
  • Data broadcast: Speed, Power (estimated), cadence
  • Wheel size compatibility: 24″ up to , 29″
  • Hub compatibility types: 130mm, 135mm
  • Total weight: 16.3kg
  • Flywheel inert (kkgmm2): 5720 (28300 Drivo)
  • Inertia: 140 (175 KICKR)
  • Max wattage (at 60kmph): 1600W
  • Max incline (75kg rider at 37kmph): 10%

Elite Rampa Manual

Elite Rampa

The manual can be found here

Using the device
Elite Rampa

Once you have built the Rampa, it is then time to install the Elite app to get the system calibrated. So where is the Elite app? Jolly good question! If you type “Elite app into the Apple App Store, you will find that “elite” is a relatively common term in there. Fifteen apps scrolled through and still nothing relating to a turbo! There is even one app for “Elite Fitness Downtown” with a logo which looks suspiciously like Elite’s, but one thing there doesn’t appear to be AN ELITE app.

Elite Drivo Turbo

Shortly after googling for the Elite’s app, it becomes apparent why I had failed to find anything –  Elite’s app doesn’t feature the brand’s name! Instead, is called “myEtraining“… I’ll leave you to ponder why
Elite Drivo Turbo

The difficulty in finding that app is all the more surprising when you realise that the app is not merely a firmware update/calibration app, but is a full stand-alone training app if you want it to be!

Elite RampaOnce downloaded and installed, the connection to your Elite Rampa is very straight forward – Just use the camera on your phone scan the QR code on the back of the Rampa, and we’re away
Elite Rampa

I wish more companies used QR codes for connecting their devices initially; it would make life so much easier!

Elite Rampa

With the Elite Rampa found and powered up, you continue to link any other Bluetooth sensors you have to app, as mentioned above to allow you to use the app as stand alone cycling software without a separate cycling head. The app will also list the firmware version, but I have not seen an update come out while using the trainer, so can’t comment on the process

Elite Drivo Turbo

Now for my usual Zwift Gear Tests, I compare one power meter against two others, if all three line up, we say the new power meter looks alright. In the course of this review, I have paired three different power meters to the Elite app about calibrating the Rampa, and I’ll explain why.

Elite Rampa

Now, do you remember from the settings section that the Elite Rampa doesn’t have a power meter, but a power ESTIMATOR? Well here is where that fact becomes important: If you want to replace the factory calibration with your own, you need to have another power meter, which can connect in the app. This may prevent a lot of potential buyers from self-calibrating, given the price point for the Rampa and the price point of most power meters.

To set your calibration, go into the Elite app, settings> advance configuration, to get access to the calibration wizards

Elite Rampa

Now Elite counter that by saying as an estimator, that is calibrated in the factory, recalibration is not something which is likely to be needed, unless you are getting odd results, as the Rampa shouldn’t be affected by the drift which can be seen with strain gauges.

Elite Rampa

For the sake of completeness let’s do a calibration before putting the Rampa on Zwift. As the calibration starts with a 10 minute warm up, I get the impression calibration is not going to be short procedure

Elite Rampa

When you have completed the warm up, you start on three different steps for the calibration. P1, P2, and P3, each requiring you to cycle and maintain different constant speeds. The wattage needed to do so is then recorded for each step, and used for the calibration curve. Unfortunately, as you can see, the tiny marker at the bottom of an iPhone screen is not the easiest to keep an eye on, when you are maintaining ~ 250watts, which is what the P1 stage required.

Elite Rampa

After keeping the little red bike in the narrow band, right at the bottom of the screen, nothing had changed for 20 mins, I started to get suspicious something wasn’t working well

Elite Rampa

Keeping going for another five mins, I ended looking like this. Really not a happy chap. You shouldn’t end up with sweat dripping off your nose merely trying to calibrate a turbo!

Elite Rampa

Heck, I thought, again the Elite Rampa has a power estimator, not a strain gauge, let’s just try it as is, and trust the calibration from the factory. So PowerTap C1 and 4iiii Precision power meter were connected to different head units for comparison. Now even thought the Rampa failed its calibration, both other external power meters were calibrated, before going for a quick spin on Zwift

Elite Rampa

My first blast on Zwift was just a small ride with Team X, no formal testing regarding my regular Jon’s mix workout. When I’m riding a new power meter, but not wanting to affect my ride on Zwift, I don’t select that unit as my Zwift power meter, so had the Rampa power being recorded my Garmin.

Elite Rampa

When I downloaded the data, to compare how the three units had reported, the Rampa didn’t look to be pin sharp while on the flats with the guys bumbling along at about 150watts. The issue appears to be that the power estimator determines your wattage from your speed, so you get a little blunting to the results. Then a short sprint and oh… what happened there!

Elite Rampa

Now the smoothing is one issue, but where has my power gone!?! From various reviews in the past, of the Wahoo KICKR Snap (which is also a flywheel, rather than a strain gauge) and Elite’s Drivo, we know that the 4iiii and the PowerTap compare favourably against these turbos power readings and so can be considered to be reliable. So why am I losing such large amounts of power on the sprints with the Rampa???!!  Heck even looking at the raw data, it’s simply just an odd picture

Elite Rampa

Attributing the issue to a calibration issue, I tried again on the Rampa. But this time was not able to get beyond the P1 stage, after doing another 20mins on the calibration settings.  I did genuinely wonder if there was something wrong with my legs, in that I wasn’t able to maintain exactly the right power, or steady enough for the 30-60 secs Elite stated it would take to calibrate

Elite Rampa

There is a slight issue with wheel on trainers generally that there are several possible variables such as the tyre pressure, temperature humidity and how tightly the trainer is pressed against the wheel, which may affect your readings. So while waiting to hear back from Elite about the issue, I faffed around making sure the tyre was optimally inflated and that the turbo was pressed snuggly against the wheel, following instructions as in the manual and went for another quick 5km spin with a couple of sprints…

Elite Rampa

Things hadn’t improved, and if anything, maybe a little under recording now on the steady sections, but the sprints are still significantly out

Elite Power

Next graph I’ve loosened the clamp slightly. The smoothing is causing less of an issue, but the sprint is still not happyElite Rampa

If we look at the raw data, on the sprint now I’m “only” losing the region of 80-100 Watts

Elite Rampa

After having several conversations with Elite in Italy, they advised various solutions. Long story short, after five different attempts to calibrate the unit, Elite sent a replacement resistance unit.Elite Rampa

With the new resistance unit, installed it was time to stop faffing around and formally take on Zwift’s Jon’s Mix

Elite Rampa

So how did the new resistance unit compare? Well, we are still missing out the sharpness compared to a dedicated strain gauge. But I think it is important to realise we are comparing apples to oranges with that comparison though

Elite Rampa

There is still some variation during the sprints. The peaks are undoubtedly are blunted, but the overall shape of the graph matches much more effectively than with before. Not forgetting that there are also going to be some drive train losses comparing a chain mounted power meter and a turbo measuring power from the tyre.

During hard accelerations, some wheel on trainers can slip slightly, especially if not tightened fully. The elastogel cover helps to stop that happening, making the Elite Rampa more responsive, but that is not sufficient to overcome the characteristics of a power estimator rather than a power meter.

But what about calibration? You have said you were not able to calibrate the previous unit, what about now? I’m sorry to say, no joy. Using both the PowerTap C1, and the 4iiii Precision during different calibration attempts I was unable to get the calibration to pass the P2 stage – it took my 35mins to get to that point during one calibration attempt!

So leaving the power estimator component of the Rampa alone for a moment, how does the Elite Rampa fair when you are riding on the hills of Watopia? Said with the caveat of the knowledge that the Elite Rampa has a maximum slope of 10%, riding around Watopia the resistance changes felt muted. There were certainly no odd characteristics such as seen with early Wahoo KICKR firmware, where you would find an oddly increased resistance going down hills over fast undulated terrain on Watopia, but again, I come to back to my previous word use, terrain changes felt a little muted

Elite Rampa

What about during Zwift workouts? Broadly I found the changes in resistance had a very small, but noticeable lag with them. This responsivity would make it seem more of an effort to hit the correct target wattage, especially on short 10-30 sec segments. On the Elite Drivo, changes would be pin sharp; it would almost feel like you’d cycled into a wall. With the Rampa, you’d feel the resistance increase, less fiercely, much like my general feeling on using the Elite Rampa on Watopia, muted is a reasonable word to use

Elite Rampa

Sound Test

Of course no #ZwiftGearTest would be complete without the inclusion of an audio test… Now before I go any further, the noise on a wheel on trainer is going to be dependent on many variables, not least the tyre you run it on. The elastogel coating to the roller is supposed to reduce noise on the Elite Rampa, I’m inclined to but that down purely to marketing speak with regard to actual decibel readings, as the Elite Rampa is not a quiet turbo when you drop the hammer. Whilst the KICKR might have a scream, the Elite Rampa has a roar! I’d be cautious of coming to any wheel on turbo if noise is a significant issue for you.

Conclusion

Elite Rampa

So there we have the Elite Rampa, a mid-range turbo trainer, in a stylish Italian suit!

Regarding the build quality, the Rampa is a great bit of kit and will add flare to your pain cave. It is also exceptionally easy to set up, store and pack away – this is an important aspect for many Zwifters who have to setups and take down their system after every ride. The relative ease of taking the resistance unit off the A-frame does also lend itself to the possibility of the Rampa being one of the more portable turbo trainers regarding travelling.

The power estimator, the in the Rampa, does put some limitations on the turbo. But as previously mentioned, many power meters will cost as much as the Elite Rampa on its own, so it is important to remember the price point we are talking about here.  At £335 from Athleteshop, the cheapest I have been able to find the Elite Rampa for, that is a £164 less than the cheapest Wahoo KICKR Snap I have been able to find.

That is going to be a significant price difference for many people. I’m going to give the Elite Rampa 3/5 – the calibration system employed with the Elite Rampa is an issue, but there are many things to love and admire on this Italian turbo, not least the price. For many people, this is going to be a good starter smart trainer, or perhaps a travelling trainer for the committed Zwifter

Elite Rampa

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Comments

  1. […] Yes, thankyou! I don’t mind if I do! After having written reviews of the Elite Drivo and the Elite Rampa, Elite asked if I was interested in going to Treviso to have a look a new machine for their turbo […]

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  2. I have owned the Rampa since Dec, and found it almost impossible to read the app for calibration purposes, though it did work for me when I tried it. Instead, I opted to download the Elite Calibration Windows Tool and used this. It was much easier to read and use – though both options required me to borrow P1 Pedals from a friend. Not great if you don’t have such a friend and also makes it very tricky to calibrate on a regular basis. I set my calibration in December and now just trust it is still good…:?

    For the first month or so I had issues with noise from the bike moving in the Rampa frame, when doing power intervals or low rpm climbs. The bike would rock a bit side to side (that’s the design and it actually feels good) and a horrible metallic creaking would fill the air. I reported this to Elite, who were not helpful. However, I found a change of QR skewer pretty much fixed this issue.

    I also see that in the spec in this article it says that the max gradient for the Rampa is 10% for a 75kg rider at 37kph. This may be true, but I can’t ride a 10% slope at 37kph, For mortals, like myself, the manual says: “Each rider has a maximum slope given his weight [i.e., for a 60kg (130lbs) cyclist at 24Km/h (15mph) the maximum simulatable slope is about 10%]” (- from page 16 under Slope). but I can’t ride a 10% slope at 24kph either, and I’m heavier than 60kgs.

    I weigh around 65kg and find on Zwift that the Rampa is pretty decent (realistic) for me, for all climbs to about 8.5%. Once the gradient goes above this then Zwift has to simulate the gradient by reducing the virtual speed. Admittedly, if I could climb these grades faster the realistic gradient would be higher, as it is all about the power at certain speeds.

    Overall, and as wheel-on trainer I am very happy with the Elite Rampa. I would perhaps like a trainer that can deliver higher power at lower speeds, and hence simulate a higher gradient. But this is really only an issue when I ride Zwift, and hit the steeper climbs – something I don’t do on every ride. Perhaps one day I will get a direct-drive, but for now the Rampa is good for me.

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  3. Sounds reasonable. To be honest, the last graph shows that Rampa is pretty accurate (for power estimator), thats why I’m interested in some avg numbers.

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  4. PS – I don’t think I should have to get an ANT+ dongle, just to use zWift/sufferfest etc when it is advertised as having BT.

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  5. I have similar problems with Rampa on Zwift by BT. I don’t have a power meter, so can’t compare as accurately as you can, but some of the changes in speed look and feel familiar, and I often get dropped as a result, then have to work really hard to get back to group. It’s annoying.
    I agree with the wheel tension device, it’s hard to get consistency with this, and without a spin down calibration, I have to ‘invent’ one of my own, with speed, and them time to stop.
    I wish I had bought a Kickr snap instead, more robust, better (attempts anyway) at calibration.

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  6. I have had the Rampa for a couple of months now and love it, especially with Zwift but the Elite App has its use as well. However, BT does not work well with Zwift, not on PC nor iOS. I kept spinning out via BT on the flats and downhill, very difficult to keep up in races. I finally got an ANT+ dongle and everything is fine. Watt numbers are reported the same but it seems that for some reason the “virtual gearing” is much more realistic. So if you have a Rampa and dont’ have an ANT+ dongle, I’d recommend you get one.

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  7. Hi. I own a elite rampa that i use a lot to zwift, finally a reason to why i always loose on sprints!.. Apart from that, its nice to see that is spot on, or either little bellow real watts when racing in the 280-350W intervals, i was concerned i was getting unfair advantage 🙂

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  8. Two things,
    – could you post average power of Rampa vs PowerMeter on some ride?
    – In last graph you said that Rampa has 3s smoothing, is there a way to disable this one, isn’t this in settings of zwift?

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    • I have put the 3 secs smoothing on all of the graphs. It is a function I run Excel.

      The 3 sec something is applied to all three power meter data streams.

      I’ll try and find the averages when I get back

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